Wednesday, November 22, 2006

What Goes Around Comes Around

Amy Goodman's new column opens with a humdinger:
Frederick Douglass, the renowned abolitionist, began life as a slave on Maryland's Eastern Shore. When his owner had trouble with the young, unruly slave, Douglass was sent to Edward Covey, a notorious "slave breaker." Covey's plantation, where physical and psychological torture were standard, was called Mount Misery. Douglass eventually fought back, escaped to the North and went on to change the world. Today Mount Misery is owned by Donald Rumsfeld, the outgoing secretary of defense.
I can see it now: when Rummy gets hauled before a human rights tribunal, he pleads demonic possession. "The disembodied spirit of Edward Covey made me do it."

Busy today; be back tomorrow with some Random Flickr Blogging, hopefully. Happy Thanksgiving!


Comments:
Heard an excerpt from one of our Gitmo'ed Frederick Douglas's on NPR yesterday. It was just a bit of sound from one of the detention hearings, and one could clearly hear the despair and fatalism in the young man's voice. "Do you ever find anyone innocent?"

Oh god.
 
Pete/Buffoon sent me a link to that same editorial this morning, and I found it just chilling. Explains a lot, I guess.

Does it make me an uncharitable person to want to see Rummy's neck stretched for the crimes he has committed and encouraged and enabled and condoned? For almost single-handedly ruining this once-great country? Dog, that guy is evil incarnate.
 
There's charity, and then there's justice. It may be uncharitable to want to see Rummy hanged, but I'm not sure it's unjust. One of the things that galls me most is the thought that none of the higher-ups in ChimpCo (as jules and I call it) will ever pay for Iraq, Katrina, the skyrocketing national debt, etc. -- they'll just leave government and move on to their multiple mansions and six-figure speaking fees and cushy think-tank sinecures. It's almost enough to make you believe in God -- so there'd be an entity capable of bringing it about that, eventually, bad people are punished for their crimes. And there's our morning dose of Kant.
 
There's charity, and then there's justice. It may be uncharitable to want to see Rummy hanged, but I'm not sure it's unjust. One of the things that galls me most is the thought that none of the higher-ups in ChimpCo (as jules and I call it) will ever pay for Iraq, Katrina, the skyrocketing national debt, etc. -- they'll just leave government and move on to their multiple mansions and six-figure speaking fees and cushy think-tank sinecures. It's almost enough to make you believe in God -- so there'd be an entity capable of bringing it about that, eventually, bad people are punished for their crimes. And there's our morning dose of Kant.
 
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